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Steve Rolston

Professor

Fellow
Profile Photo of Steve Rolston

Contact Information

UMD

Email:
rolston@umd.edu
Office:

University of Maryland

2151 PSC Building

College Park, MD 20742

Office Phone:
(301) 405-7189

Research Groups

Recent News

  • Man in front of american flag

    Alumnus Jonathan Hoffman Heads Toward New Horizon in Navigation Science

    February 24, 2023

    As a PhD graduation present, UMD physics alumnus Jonathan Hoffman’s adviser gave him a signed copy of the book Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time. The book follows John Harrison, an 18th-century carpenter who took it upon himself to solve what was known as the longitude problem by building a series of 5 clocks, the best timekeepers to date. Eight years later, as a program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Hoffman has started a new program called H6 seeking to build a spiritual successor to Harrison’s clocks: a “6th clock” that would be a compact, affordable, and precise device that would help navigate in situations where a GPS signal is unavailable.

  • Two (Photons) is Company, Three’s a Crowd

    April 26, 2021

    Photons—the quantum particles of light—normally don’t have any sense of personal space. A laser crams tons of photons into a tight beam, and they couldn’t care less that they are packed on top of each other. Two beams can even pass through each other without noticing. This is all well and good when making an extravagant laser light show or using a laser level to hang a picture frame straight, but for researchers looking to develop quantum technologies that require precise control over just one or two photons, this lack of interaction often makes life difficult. Now, a group of UMD researchers has come together to create tailored interactions between photons in an experiment where, at least for photons, two’s company but three’s a crowd. The technique builds on many previous experiments that use atoms as intermediaries to form connections between photons that are akin to the bonds between protons, electrons and other kinds of matter. These interactions, along with the ability to control them, promises new opportunities for researchers to study the physics of exotic interactions and develop light-based quantum technologies.

  • Remote Quantum Systems Produce Interfering Photons

    December 17, 2019

    Scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) have observed, for the first time, interference between particles of light created using a trapped ion and a collection of neutral atoms. Their results could be an essential step toward the realization of a distributed network of quantum computers capable of processing information in novel ways.