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Jacob Taylor

Adjunct Professor

Fellow
Profile photo of Jacob Taylor

Contact Information

UMD

Email:
jmtaylor@umd.edu
Office:

University of Maryland

2101 Atlantic Building. #224

College Park, MD 20742

Office Phone:
(301) 405-7905

NIST

Email:
jmtaylor@umd.edu
Office Phone:
(301) 975-8586

Additional Info

Research Groups

Recent Publications

Recent News

  • Unveiling the Universe: In 4 New Studies, NIST Explores Novel Ways to Hunt Dark Matter

    December 9, 2022

    Scientists have been searching for dark matter with no success for more than 30 years. JQI and other NIST researchers are now exploring new ways to search for the invisible particles. In one study, a prototype for a much larger experiment, researchers have used state-of-the-art superconducting detectors to hunt for dark matter. The study has already placed new limits on the possible mass of one type of hypothesized dark matter. Another NIST team has proposed that trapped electrons, commonly used to measure properties of ordinary particles, could also serve as highly sensitive detectors of hypothetical dark matter particles if they carry charge.

  • A photo of JQI Fellow Jacob Taylor

    Taylor Receives Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award

    January 20, 2021

    JQI Fellow Jake Taylor has been recognized by the federal government for his role in expanding U.S. policy and efforts in the fiercely competitive field of quantum information science. Taylor, who is also a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is the recipient of the 2020 Gold Medal Award from the Department of Commerce.

  • Stars in the night sky

    A Billion Tiny Pendulums Could Detect the Universe’s Missing Mass

    October 21, 2020

    Researchers at JQI and their colleagues have proposed a novel method for finding dark matter, the cosmos’s mystery material that has eluded detection for decades. Dark matter makes up about 27% of the universe; ordinary matter, such as the stuff that builds stars and planets, accounts for just 5% of the cosmos. (A mysterious entity called dark energy, accounts for the other 68%.)