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Latest News and Research

Enhancing Simulations of Curved Space with Qubits

One of the mind-bending ideas that physicists and mathematicians have come up with is that space itself—not just objects in space—can be curved. When space curves (as happens dramatically near a black hole), sizes and directions defy normal intuition. Understanding curved spaces is important to expanding our knowledge of the universe, but it is fiendishly difficult to study curved spaces in a lab setting (even using simulations). A previous collaboration between researchers at JQI explored using labyrinthine circuits made of superconducting resonators to simulate the physics of certain curved spaces. In particular, the team looked at hyperbolic lattices that represent... Continue Reading

Sau Named UMD Co-Director of JQI

JQI Fellow Jay Sau has been appointed the newest UMD Co-Director of JQI. He assumed the role on January 1, 2022. Continue Reading

A graphic showing the difference between localized and thermal chains of ions
In a Smooth Move, Ions Ditch Disorder and Keep Their Memories

Scientists have found a new way to create disturbances that do not fade away. Instead of relying on disorder to freeze things in place, they tipped a quantum container to one side—a trick that is easier to conjure in the lab. A collaboration between the experimental group of College Park Professor Christopher Monroe and the theoretical group of JQI Fellow Alexey Gorshkov, who is also a Fellow of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science, has used trapped ions to implement this new technique, confirming that it prevents their quantum particles from reaching equilibrium. The team also measured... Continue Reading

Two JQI Fellows Named 2021 Highly Cited Researchers

Two JQI Fellows are included on the Clarivate Web of Science Group’s 2021 list of Highly Cited Researchers, which recognizes influential scientists for their highly cited papers over the preceding decade. The two researchers are Sankar Das Sarma, who is also the Director of the Condensed Matter Theory Center and the Richard E. Prange Chair and Distinguished University Professor of Physics at the University of Marlyand (UMD), and Christopher Monroe, who is also a College Park Professor. Continue Reading

Hafezi Elected APS Fellow

JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi has been elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). He was cited for “pioneering theoretical and experimental work in topological photonics and quantum synthetic matter.” Continue Reading

Diamonds Are a Quantum Sensing Scientist’s Best Friend
We all know that diamonds can hold great sentimental (and monetary) value. As luck may have it, diamonds—particularly defective ones, with little errors in their crystal structure—also hold great scientific value. The defects have properties that can only be described by quantum mechanics, and researchers are working on harnessing these properties to pick up on tiny signals coming from individual biological cells. In this episode of Relatively Certain, Dina sits down with defective diamond expert Ronald Walsworth, the founding director of the Quantum Technology Center at the University of Maryland (UMD), as well as Minta Martin professor of electrical and... Continue Reading
Foundational Step Shows Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts

Pobody’s nerfect—not even the indifferent, calculating bits that are the foundation of computers. But JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe’s group, together with colleagues from Duke University, have made progress toward ensuring we can trust the results of quantum computers even when they are built from pieces that sometimes fail. They have shown in an experiment, for the first time, that an assembly of quantum computing pieces can be better than the worst parts used to make it. In a paper published in the journal Nature on Oct. 4, 2021, the team shared how they took this landmark step toward reliable, practical... Continue Reading

Novel Design May Boost Efficiency of On-Chip Frequency Combs

On the cover of the Pink Floyd album Dark Side of the Moon, a prism splits a ray of light into all the colors of the rainbow. This multicolored medley, which owes its emergence to the fact that light travels as a wave, is almost always hiding in plain sight; a prism simply reveals that it was there. For instance, sunlight is a mixture of many different colors of light, each bobbing up and down with their own characteristic frequency. But taken together the colors merge into a uniform yellowish glow. A prism, or something like it, can also undo this... Continue Reading

Upcoming Events

January 31, 2022
Cheng Gong | Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Quantum Technology Center, University of Maryland, College Park
February 7, 2022
TBA
Vinod Menon | The City College of New York
February 14, 2022
TBA
Michael Huber | National Institute of Standards and Technology

Latest News and Research

  • Enhancing Simulations of Curved Space with Qubits

    One of the mind-bending ideas that physicists and mathematicians have come up with is that space itself—not just objects in space—can be curved. When space curves (as happens dramatically near a black hole), sizes and directions defy normal intuition. Understanding curved spaces is important to expanding our knowledge of the universe, but it is fiendishly difficult to study curved spaces in a... Continue Reading

  • Sau Named UMD Co-Director of JQI

    JQI Fellow Jay Sau has been appointed the newest UMD Co-Director of JQI. He assumed the role on January 1, 2022. Continue Reading

  • A graphic showing the difference between localized and thermal chains of ions
    In a Smooth Move, Ions Ditch Disorder and Keep Their Memories

    Scientists have found a new way to create disturbances that do not fade away. Instead of relying on disorder to freeze things in place, they tipped a quantum container to one side—a trick that is easier to conjure in the lab. A collaboration between the experimental group of College Park Professor Christopher Monroe and the theoretical group of JQI Fellow Alexey Gorshkov, who is also a Fellow... Continue Reading

  • Two JQI Fellows Named 2021 Highly Cited Researchers

    Two JQI Fellows are included on the Clarivate Web of Science Group’s 2021 list of Highly Cited Researchers, which recognizes influential scientists for their highly cited papers over the preceding decade. The two researchers are Sankar Das Sarma, who is also the Director of the Condensed Matter Theory Center and the Richard E... Continue Reading

  • Hafezi Elected APS Fellow

    JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi has been elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). He was cited for “pioneering theoretical and experimental work in topological photonics and quantum synthetic matter.” Continue Reading

  • Diamonds Are a Quantum Sensing Scientist’s Best Friend
    We all know that diamonds can hold great sentimental (and monetary) value. As luck may have it, diamonds—particularly defective ones, with little errors in their crystal structure—also hold great scientific value. The defects have properties that can only be described by quantum mechanics, and researchers are working on harnessing these properties to pick up on tiny signals coming from individual... Continue Reading
  • Foundational Step Shows Quantum Computers Can Be Better Than the Sum of Their Parts

    Pobody’s nerfect—not even the indifferent, calculating bits that are the foundation of computers. But JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe’s group, together with colleagues from Duke University, have made progress toward ensuring we can trust the results of quantum computers even when they are built from pieces that sometimes fail. They have shown in an experiment, for the first time, that an... Continue Reading

  • Novel Design May Boost Efficiency of On-Chip Frequency Combs

    On the cover of the Pink Floyd album Dark Side of the Moon, a prism splits a ray of light into all the colors of the rainbow. This multicolored medley, which owes its emergence to the fact that light travels as a wave, is almost always hiding in plain sight; a prism simply reveals that it was there. For instance, sunlight is a mixture of many different colors of light, each bobbing up... Continue Reading

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