RSS icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Vimeo icon
YouTube icon

A slow atom source using a collimated effusive oven and a single-layer variable pitch coil Zeeman slower

TitleA slow atom source using a collimated effusive oven and a single-layer variable pitch coil Zeeman slower
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsS. C. Bell, M. Junker, M. Jasperse, L. D. Turner, Y. - J. Lin, I. B. Spielman, and R. E. Scholten
JournalRev. Sci. Instrum.
Volume81
Pagination013105
Date Publishedjan
ISSN1089-7623
Keywords2010, magnetic fields, magnetic traps, magneto-optical effects, rubidium, thermocouples
Abstract

We describe a simple slow atom source for loading a rubidium magneto-optical trap. The source includes an effusive oven with a long heated collimation tube. Almost all components are standard vacuum parts. The heating elements and thermocouples are external to the vacuum, protecting them from the hostile hot alkali environment and allowing repair without breaking vacuum. The thermal source is followed by a Zeeman slower with a single-layer coil of variable winding pitch. The single-layer design is simple to construct and has low inductance which allows for rapid switching of the magnetic field. The coil pitch was determined by fitting the analytic form of the magnetic field for a variable winding pitch to the desired magnetic field profile required to slow atoms. The measured magnetic field for the constructed coil is in excellent agreement with the desired field. The source produces atoms at 35 m/s with a flux up to 2 x 10(10) cm(-2) s(-1) at 200 degrees C.

URLhttp://link.aip.org/link/?RSINAK/81/013105/1

Subscribe to A Quantum Bit 

Quantum physics began with revolutionary discoveries in the early twentieth century and continues to be central in today’s physics research. Learn about quantum physics, bit by bit. From definitions to the latest research, this is your portal. Subscribe to receive regular emails from the quantum world. Previous Issues...

Sign Up Now

Sign up to receive A Quantum Bit in your email!

 Have an idea for A Quantum Bit? Submit your suggestions to jqi-comm@umd.edu