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Creation and manipulation of Feshbach resonances with radiofrequency radiation

TitleCreation and manipulation of Feshbach resonances with radiofrequency radiation
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsT. M. Hanna, E. Tiesinga, and P. S. Julienne
JournalNew J. Phys.
Volume12
Pagination083031
Date Publishedaug
ISSN1367-2630
Keywords2010
Abstract

We present a simple technique for studying collisions of ultracold atoms in the presence of a magnetic field and radio-frequency radiation (rf). Resonant control of scattering properties can be achieved by using rf to couple a colliding pair of atoms to a bound state. We show, using the example of 6Li, that in some ranges of rf frequency and magnetic field this can be done without giving rise to losses. We also show that halo molecules of large spatial extent require much less rf power than deeply bound states. Another way to exert resonant control is with a set of rf-coupled bound states, linked to the colliding pair through the molecular interactions that give rise to magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances. This was recently demonstrated for 87Rb [Kaufman et al., Phys. Rev. A 80:050701(R), 2009]. We examine the underlying atomic and molecular physics which made this possible. Lastly, we consider the control that may be exerted over atomic collisions by placing atoms in superpositions of Zeeman states, and suggest that it could be useful where small changes in scattering length are required. We suggest other species for which rf and magnetic field control could together provide a useful tuning mechanism.

URLhttp://arxiv.org/abs/1004.0636
DOI10.1088/1367-2630/12/8/083031

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