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Research News

May 26, 2015 | Research News

Moving out of equilibrium

Physicists use theoretical and experimental techniques to develop explanations of the goings-on in nature. Somewhat surprisingly, many phenomena such as electrical conduction can be explained through relatively simplified mathematical pictures — models that were constructed well before the advent of modern computation. And then there are things in nature that push even the limits of high performance computing and sophisticated experimental tools.

May 12, 2015 | Research News

Magic Wavelengths

Rydberg atoms, atoms whose outermost electrons are highly excited but not ionized, might be just the thing for processing quantum information.  These outsized atoms can be sustained for a long time in a quantum superposition condition---a good thing for creating qubits---and they can interact strongly with other such atoms, making them useful for devising the kind of logic gates needed to process information.   Scientists at JQI and at other labs are pursuing this promising research area.

April 23, 2015 | PFC | Research News

Tightening the Bounds on the Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but JQI physicists have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is. The work implies that quantum processors will work more slowly than some research has suggested. 

April 20, 2015 | Research News

Getting Better All the Time

From NIST TechBeat

March 25, 2015 | Research News

A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI Fellow Vladimir Manucharyan and colleagues at Harvard University used NV centers in diamond to sense the properties of magnetic field noise tens of nanometers away from the silver samples.

March 19, 2015 | PFC | Research News

Sharper Nanoscopy

A new study from Edo Waks' group has shown how to sharpen nanoscale microscopy (nanoscopy) even more by better locating the exact position of the light source. The improvement involves taking into account the phantom dipole induced in the surface of a nanowire by the presence of a nearby quantum dot. The interference of light emitted by the dot with light emitted (in effect) by the phantom distorts the estimation of the dot's true location.

February 26, 2015 | PFC | Research News

Modular Entanglement Using Atomic Ion Qubits

JQI researchers, under the direction of Christopher Monroe have demonstrated modular entanglement between two atomic systems, separated by one meter. Here, photons are the long distance information carriers entangling multiple qubit modules.

February 18, 2015 | Research News

Microfluidic Diamond Sensor

Measuring faint magnetic fields is a trillion-dollar business.  Gigabytes of data, stored and quickly retrieved from chips the size of a coin, are at the heart of consumer electronics.   Even higher data densities can be achieved by enhancing magnetic detection sensitivity---perhaps down to nano-tesla levels.

February 9, 2015 | Research News

Michelson-Morley Experiment for Electrons

 A new experiment conducted at the University of California at Berkeley used quantum information techniques for a precision test of a cornerstone principle of physics, namely Lorentz invariance.  This precept holds that the results of a physics experiment do not depend on its absolute spatial orientation.  The work uses quantum-correlated electrons within a pair of calcium ions to look for shifts in quantum energy levels with unprecedented sensitivity.   JQI Adjunct Fellow and University of Delaware professor Marianna Safronova, who contributed a theoretical analysis of the data, said that

January 19, 2015 | Research News

Rice-sized laser, powered one electron at a time, bodes well for quantum computing

Researchers from JQI and Princeton University have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or "maser," powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons.

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