RSS icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Vimeo icon
YouTube icon

Research News

July 17, 2014 | Research News

Highly-Charged Ions

The world is mostly neutral. That is, most of the atoms in our environment are electrically neutral. The number of electrons in the outer parts of atoms equals the number of protons at the centers of atoms. As one or more electrons are plucked away from the atoms, the remaining electrons feel a much stronger positive pull from the nucleus.

July 9, 2014 | PFC | Research News

Making Quantum Connections

In quantum mechanics, interactions between particles can give rise to entanglement, which is a strange type of connection that could never be described by a non-quantum, classical theory. These connections, called quantum correlations, are present in entangled systems even if the objects are not physically linked (with wires, for example). Entanglement is at the heart of what distinguishes purely quantum systems from classical ones; it is why they are potentially useful, but it sometimes makes them very difficult to understand.

July 2, 2014 | Research News

Superconducting-Silicon Qubits

Theorists propose a way to make superconducting quantum devices such as Josephson junctions and qubits, atom-by-atom, inside a silicon crystal.

May 27, 2014 | Research News

Advanced Light

Michael Lewis’s bestselling book Flash Boys describes how some brokers, engaging in high frequency trading, exploit fast telecommunications to gain fraction-of-a-second advantage in the buying and selling of stocks. But you don’t need to have billions of dollars riding on this-second securities transactions to appreciate the importance of fast signal processing. From internet to video streaming, we want things fast.

May 5, 2014 | Research News

Stimulated Mutual Annihilation

Twenty years ago, Philip Platzman and Allen Mills, Jr. at Bell Laboratories proposed that a gamma-ray laser could be made from a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of positronium, the simplest atom made of both matter and antimatter (1).

March 19, 2014 | Research News

Cold Chaos

At sub-micro-kelvin temperatures atoms or molecules move so slowly that it is better to think of them as spread-out, wavelike things a micron or more across, many times larger than any putative bond length (typically sub-nanometer in size) that would characterize bound molecules. A new experiment conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria adds a new twist to this picture.

March 6, 2014 | Research News

Up-Converted Radio

Ever worry about losing your mobile-phone reception? The problem is a weak microwave signal. A new approach to this important problem provides a clean, all-optical detection of microwaves and radiowaves featuring noise mitigation a thousand times better than existing methods.

February 25, 2014 | PFC | Research News

How do you build a large-scale quantum computer?

Physicists led by ion-trapper Christopher Monroe at the JQI have proposed a modular quantum computer architecture that promises scalability to much larger numbers of qubits. The components of this architecture have individually been tested and are available, making it a promising approach. In the paper, the authors present expected performance and scaling calculations, demonstrating that their architecture is not only viable, but in some ways, preferable when compared to related schemes.

February 14, 2014 | Research News

Solitary Confinement

Atomic nuclei are governed by laws quite distinct from those that regulate atomic electrons, which constitute the outer part of atoms and which are immediately responsible for light, chemistry and thus life. Yet there are sporadic regions of contact between these disparate realms. JQI Adjunct Fellow Marianna Safronova and her collaborators have been exploring one area of nuclear-atomic overlap for the isotope thorium-229.

JQI at APS
February 13, 2014 | People News | Research News

JQI at APS

The following papers with JQI authors will be presented at the March meeting of the American Physical Society, being held March 2-7, 2014 in Denver.

February 12, 2014 | PFC | Research News

Stirring-up atomtronics in a quantum circuit

Atomtronics is an emerging technology whereby physicists use ensembles of atoms to build analogs to electronic circuit elements. Modern electronics relies on utilizing the charge properties of the electron. Using lasers and magnetic fields, atomic systems can be engineered to have behavior analogous to that of electrons, making them an exciting platform for studying and generating alternatives to charge-based electronics.

Pages

Subscribe to A Quantum Bit 

Quantum physics began with revolutionary discoveries in the early twentieth century and continues to be central in today’s physics research. Learn about quantum physics, bit by bit. From definitions to the latest research, this is your portal. Subscribe to receive regular emails from the quantum world. Previous Issues...

Sign Up Now

Sign up to receive A Quantum Bit in your email!

 Have an idea for A Quantum Bit? Submit your suggestions to jqi-comm@umd.edu