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Quantum Conversations

Quantum Conversations is produced by the Joint Quantum Institute and hosted by Emily Edwards and Phil Schewe, with frequent guest Steven Rolston. The show covers recent developments and the history of quantum information science through discussions with world leaders in the field. Both Emily and Phil are physicists by training, but now work on communicating science to the public. Rolston is a professor and Co-Director at the JQI. This podcast was previously called the Quantum Wire and hosted by Curt Suplee.

This past March, NIST Fellows Joseph Reader and Charles Clark co-authored an article in Physics Today: "1932, a watershed year in nuclear physics."

In a small detour from our typical quantum conversation, Charles sat down with Phil to recount some remarkable nuclear physics discoveries made that year. This podcast details the search for an isotope of hydrogen, culminating in the discovery of deuterium (heavy water).

Phil Schewe discusses quantized energy levels with Steve Rolston (JQI) and Wes Campbell (former JQI postdoc and current UCLA professor). The concept of electronic energy levels in an atom has applications everywhere, from sodium lamps to brake lights to quantum information and atomic clocks.

Can you see a single photon? Does it weigh anything? Emily Edwards talks to Alan Migdall, an expert on single photon technology. Part 2 of three installments on photons. 

Phil Schewe discusses how matter, such as atoms and electrons, can display wave-like properties. Steve Rolston describes early scattering experiments. Gretchen Campbell talks about matter waves in the context of modern Bose-Einstein condensate experiments.

 

Emily Edwards and guests Steve Rolston and Alan Migdall talk about the history of the photon. Photons sometimes behave both like particles and waves. The nature of light has intrigued scientists for centuries. Quantum physics provides clarity in the early twentieth century.

Solving the mystery of blackbody radiation brings on the quantum revolution. Phil Schewe, Emily Edwards, and Steve Rolston discuss this pivotal moment for modern physics. 2006 Nobel Prize laureate John Mather discusses how his work relates to blackbody radiation.

Fifty years ago, Theodore Maiman invented the laser. Steve Rolston and two guest experts describe how the device has utterly transformed quantum information science.

Modern timekeeping, and the ongoing effort to slice time into ever-thinner pieces, now depend critically on techniques of quantum information science.

TQW looks at recent research in the weird world of "ultracold" chemistry, where scientists have just discovered that chemical reactions can occur at only a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero.

A discussion of one of the most eerie aspects of quantum mechanics -- the utter randomness of measurements -- with guest Dr. Chris Monroe of JQI. Topics include the weird state called "entanglement," and the uses of quantum-mechanical systems for generating random numbers for data encryption and other purposes.

A primer on the fundamental terms and concepts of quantum information science, with guest Dr. Carl Williams, Chief of the Atomic Physics Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Topics include the bizarre condition called superposition, the nature of quantum bits ("qubits") and more.

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Quantum physics began with revolutionary discoveries in the early twentieth century and continues to be central in today’s physics research. Learn about quantum physics, bit by bit. From definitions to the latest research, this is your portal. Subscribe to receive regular emails from the quantum world. Previous Issues...

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