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JQI undergraduate honored for thesis work

Michael Kossin earns IPST Monroe Martin Prize and Departmental High Honors

Kossin, giving talk on thesis work. 

(Image credit: M. Kossin)

Michael Kossin, an undergraduate who works with JQI Fellow Luis Orozco, has been awarded an IPST Monroe Martin Prize for Undergraduate Research in Physics for his paper, "Production of a Polarizing Millimeter-Wave Fabry-Perot Resonator.” He also earned Departmental High Honors. This summer Kossin will work with Professor Alejandro Garcia at the University of Washington, whose research involves weak interactions in the nucleus. Kossin plans to attend graduate school in 2016. 
 

About the award:

Dr. Martin, a native of Lancaster, PA, studied mathematics at Lebanon Valley College before earning his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University. After completing a prestigious National Research Fellowship at Harvard University and a three-year post teaching mathematics at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., he moved to the University of Maryland as an assistant professor in 1936. By 1943 he chaired the department of mathematics. He was the founding director of the Institute of Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics (now the Institute of Physical Sciences and Technology) from 1952 to 1968. He retired from UMD in 1972, and died, at age 100, in 2007.

The Monroe H. Martin Graduate Research Fellowship Fund was established in November 2007 to support a graduate student College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences at the University of Maryland whose interests span both mathematics and physics. On his retirement from the university in 1972, his colleagues and students endowed the Monroe H. Martin Prize, an international prize honoring outstanding young mathematicians in applied mathematics. He also funded the University’s Monroe H. Martin Professorship and its Monroe Martin Prize for Undergraduate Research in Physics.

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