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JQI Fellows Honored by National Institute of Standards and Technology and U.S. Department of Commerce

JQI Fellows

From Left to Right, JQI Fellows Gretchen Campbell, Charles Clark, William Phillips, and Glenn Solomon.

Four Fellows of the Joint Quantum Institute were recognized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the U.S. Department of Commerce in the 2011 annual awards ceremonies.

The Bronze Medal Award, NIST's highest honorary recognition, is given for significant performance characterized by outstanding or significant contributions that have increased the efficiency and effectiveness of NIST. JQI Fellow Gretchen Campbell received the Bronze Medal “for proving the feasibility of atomtronics, a new field of atom-based electronics, by demonstrating the first controllable atom circuit."

The NIST Equal Employment Opportunity/Diversity Award is granted for exceptionally significant accomplishments and contributions to equal employment opportunity/diversity goals. JQI Fellow William Phillips received this Award "for his continued dedication as an ambassador for science to both the general public and underrepresented groups."

The NIST Safety Award for Superior Accomplishment is granted for unusually significant contributions to NIST Occupational Safety and Health Program activities. JQI Fellow Glenn Solomon shared a group Award "for developing, as founding members of the Engineered Nanoparticle Safety Committee, a comprehensive program for the safe use of nanoparticles at NIST."

The Gold Medal, the highest honor award of the U.S. Department of Commerce, is bestowed for distinguished performance characterized by extraordinary, notable or prestigious contributions that impact the mission of the Department of Commerce and/or one operating unit and which reflect favorably on the Department. JQI Fellow Charles Clark shared a group Gold Medal "for development of the NIST Digital Library of Mathematical Functions, an unprecedented reference on the special functions of applied mathematics".

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