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Jacob Taylor Wins a Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal

JQI Fellow Jacob Taylor receives 2012 Service to America award from US Acting Commerce Secretary Rebecca Blank.

JQI Fellow Jacob Taylor receives 2012 Service to America award from US Acting Commerce Secretary Rebecca Blank.

Credit: Sam Kittner/Kittner.com

Jacob Taylor, a fellow at the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), was named one of nine winners of this year’s Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals, also called “Sammies.” The medals, sometimes referred to as the “Oscars” of government service, will be presented by the non-profit Partnership for Public Service at a ceremony in Washington, DC on September 13.

The Partnership describes the Sammies this way: “The Service to America Medals are a powerful illustration of the good that government does, which positively affects our lives every day,” said Max Stier, Partnership for Public Service president and CEO. “We will never get what we want out of our government if we focus solely on its shortcomings and fail to celebrate its successes.”

Taylor will receive the Call to Service Medal. His citation mentions that he “has made pioneering scientific discoveries that in time could lead to significant advances in health care, communications, computing and technology.”

More information can be obtained at servicetoamericamedals.org.

Jacob Taylor is a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and also holds a position at JQI, which is operated jointly by NIST and the University of Maryland in College Park, MD.

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