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July 17, 2014 | Research News

Highly-Charged Ions

The world is mostly neutral. That is, most of the atoms in our environment are electrically neutral. The number of electrons in the outer parts of atoms equals the number of protons at the centers of atoms. As one or more electrons are plucked away from the atoms, the remaining electrons feel a much stronger positive pull from the nucleus.

July 10, 2014 | People News

Steve Rolston Named Recipient of Kirwan Undergraduate Education Award

Steve Rolston has been choosen as the recipient of the Kirwan Undergraduate Education Award for 2014. The prestigious award recognizes a faculty member who has made exceptional contributions to the quality of undergraduate education at the university.

July 9, 2014 | PFC | Research News

Making Quantum Connections

In quantum mechanics, interactions between particles can give rise to entanglement, which is a strange type of connection that could never be described by a non-quantum, classical theory. These connections, called quantum correlations, are present in entangled systems even if the objects are not physically linked (with wires, for example). Entanglement is at the heart of what distinguishes purely quantum systems from classical ones; it is why they are potentially useful, but it sometimes makes them very difficult to understand.

July 7, 2014 | People News

JQI publications in 2014 Google Scholar Metrics

On June 26, Google released its 2014 version of Scholar Metrics, which highlights influential scientific papers published between 2009 and 2013. Papers are selected by an algorithm that selects those that are the most-cited in their subject, according to the Google Scholar database.

July 2, 2014 | Research News

Superconducting-Silicon Qubits

Theorists propose a way to make superconducting quantum devices such as Josephson junctions and qubits, atom-by-atom, inside a silicon crystal.

June 26, 2014 | People News

Trey Porto speaks at "Science Cafe"

This event took place at the Busboys and Poets restaurant in downtown Washington, DC, and was part of a series of presentations meant to bring science to the public. Trey's topic was supercold atoms. After his talk he answered questions for an hour.

May 27, 2014 | Research News

Advanced Light

Michael Lewis’s bestselling book Flash Boys describes how some brokers, engaging in high frequency trading, exploit fast telecommunications to gain fraction-of-a-second advantage in the buying and selling of stocks. But you don’t need to have billions of dollars riding on this-second securities transactions to appreciate the importance of fast signal processing. From internet to video streaming, we want things fast.

May 23, 2014 | People News

Frontiers of Cold Matter

JQI fellow Paul Julienne has recently retired from NIST but continues to perform high-level theoretical research in the subject he helped to create---ultracold matter.  In honor of his birthday, a meeting called Frontiers of Cold Matter is being held May 29-30 at JQI.

May 19, 2014 | People News

JQI welcomes new Fellow Mohammad Hafezi

Mohammad Hafezi has accepted a position as a JQI Fellow and Assistant Professor in UMD's Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He started at JQI in 2009 in Jake Taylor's group as a postdoc and was promoted to senior research associate in 2012. He works at the interface of condensed matter theory and quantum optics. The focus of his research is on theoretical and experimental investigations of artificial gauge fields and topological order in photonics systems. Such systems can be exploited as robust optical devices insensitive to disorder.

May 14, 2014 | PFC | People News

JQI papers featured as New Journal of Physics "Highlights of 2013"

Papers from the groups of Ian Spielman and Jake Taylor were recently chosen as "Highlights of 2013" by the New Journal of Physics. The articles are listed below To see more highlights, visit http://iopscience.iop.org/1367-2630/page/highlights-of-2013

May 5, 2014 | Research News

Stimulated Mutual Annihilation

Twenty years ago, Philip Platzman and Allen Mills, Jr. at Bell Laboratories proposed that a gamma-ray laser could be made from a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of positronium, the simplest atom made of both matter and antimatter (1).

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