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April 25, 2016 | People News

Gretchen Campbell named new JQI Co-Director

JQI Fellow Gretchen Campbell has been named the new NIST Co-Director of the Joint Quantum Institute, effective April 1, 2016. Campbell joined the JQI in 2009 and is also a UMD Adjunct Associate Professor and APS Fellow. In recent years she has received various accolades for her atomtronics research, including the APS Maria Goeppert-Mayer award. Campbell succeeds JQI Fellow Charles Clark, who has held the position since 2011. JQI Fellow Steven Rolston will continue as the UMD Co-Director. Rolston, on behalf of JQI, would like to thank Clark for his service.

April 22, 2016 | Research News

Oscillating currents point to practical application for topological insulators

Scientists studying an exotic material have found a potential application for its unusual properties, a discovery that could improve devices found in most digital electronics.

Under the right conditions the material, a compound called samarium hexaboride, is a topological insulator—something that conducts electricity on its surface but not through its interior. The first examples of topological insulators were only recently ...

March 30, 2016 | PFC | Research News

Measuring the magnetization of wandering spins

The swirling field of a magnet—rendered visible by a sprinkling of iron filings—emerges from the microscopic behavior of atoms and their electrons. In permanent magnets, neighboring atoms align and lock into place to create inseparable north and south poles. For other materials, magnetism can be induced by a field strong enough to coax atoms into alignment.

In both cases, atoms ...

March 16, 2016 | PFC | Research News

Rogue rubidium leads to atomic anomaly

The behavior of a few rubidium atoms in a cloud of 40,000 hardly seems important. But a handful of the tiny particles with the wrong energy may cause a cascade of effects that could impact future quantum computers.

Some proposals for quantum devices use Rydberg atoms—atoms with highly excited electrons that roam far from the nucleus—because they interact strongly with ...

February 26, 2016 | PFC | Research News

Characterizing quantum Hall light zooming around a photonic chip

When it comes to quantum physics, light and matter are not so different. Under certain circumstances, negatively charged electrons can fall into a coordinated dance that allows them to carry a current through a material laced with imperfections. That motion, which can only occur if electrons are confined to a two-dimensional plane, arises due to a phenomenon known as the ...

February 24, 2016 | People News

Waks Elevated to Fellow of the Optical Society of America

Professor Edo Waks was named a 2016 fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA). The OSA Fellow Members Committee and Board of Directors honored Professor Waks specifically for outstanding contributions to optical quantum information processing using quantum dots coupled to nanophotonic devices.

The Optical Society of America is a global enterprise dedicated to promoting technical, scientific, and educational knowledge ...

February 23, 2016 | PFC | People News

Jay Deep Sau Receives Sloan Research Fellowship

Jay Deep Sau, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Maryland and fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute, was awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship for 2016. This award, granted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, identifies 126 early-career scientists based on their potential to contribute fundamentally significant research to a wider academic community.

Sau, a theoretical condensed matter ...

February 8, 2016 | Research News

Nanoscale cavity strongly links quantum particles

Scientists have created a crystal structure that boosts the interaction between tiny bursts of light and individual electrons, an advance that could be a significant step toward establishing quantum networks in the future.

Today’s networks use electronic circuits to store information and optical fibers to carry it, and quantum networks may benefit from a similar framework. Such networks would transmit ...

February 3, 2016 | People News

Jay Deep Sau Receives National Science Foundation CAREER Award

Jay Deep Sau, an assistant professor of physics at the University of Maryland and fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute, received a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for his proposal titled “Topologically Protected Quantum Devices.” Sau, a theoretical condensed matter physicist interested in applying topological principles to create protected solid-state and cold-atomic systems ...

January 29, 2016 | People News

Sankar Das Sarma included on Thomson Reuter’s 2015 list of Highly Cited Researchers

Two researchers from the University of Maryland's College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences are included on Thomson Reuter’s 2015 list of Highly Cited Researchers, a compilation of influential names in science.

January 6, 2016 | PFC | Research News

Beating the heat

Harnessing quantum systems for information processing will require controlling large numbers of basic building blocks called qubits. The qubits must be isolated, and in most cases cooled such that, among other things, errors in qubit operations do not overwhelm the system, rendering it useless. Led by JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe, physicists have recently demonstrated important steps towards implementing a proposed ...

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