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2012 Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded

Front side of the Nobel Prize medal.

Front side of the Nobel Prize medal.

Credit: Wikipedia

The 2012 Nobel Prize for physics goes to two pioneers of quantum reality, David Wineland, who works at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the U.S, and Serge Haroche of the Collège de France and Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France.  Both performed important work with controlling and measuring qubits.

Wineland looks chiefly at ions in a trap struck by lasers, while Haroche monitors the state of microwaves in a cavity with Rydberg atoms passing through the cavity. Wineland, along with JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe, achieved the first fundamental quantum logic gate. His approach to observing trapped ions has led to the most accurate atomic clocks, operating at optical frequencies. Haroche performed numerous experiments demonstrating the quantum nature of light and the measurement of quantum states of photons without destroying the photons themselves (bibliography).

The Joint Quantum Institute is operated jointly by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD and the University of Maryland in College Park.

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