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Exploring novel quantum phases with dipole bosons in layered systems

May 8, 2014 - 12:00am
Speaker: 
Arghavan Safavi-Naini
Institution: 
Harvard (ITAMP)

Trapped polar molecules can be used to study the role of dipole-dipole interactions in stabilizing novel quantum many-body phases. In this talk we study dipoles trapped in layered geometries using quasi one- and two-dimensional traps. These configurations provide an ideal setup to explore the long-range and anisotropic character of the dipole-dipole interactions and its role in stabilizing novel quantum phases.

Specifically, we present the phase diagrams of dipoles in single, bilayer and multilayer geometries calculated using Path Integral Quantum Monte Carlo, using the Worm Algorithm. We use a two-worm algorithm to study pair formation and the many-body phases in the bilayer geometry in the absence of inter-layer tunneling. We find several non-trivial phases, such as the pair supersolid, and the pair superfluid phases.

Moreover, we have used a novel N-worm algorithm, as well as the bosonization method to study the phase diagram and the formation of chains in a stack of one-dimensional optical lattices with no inter-tube tunneling. We will show that these chains are stabilized for arbitrarily small interactions. Additionally we have found several non-trivial ground states, namely superfluids and counter-superfluids made of composites of particles from different tubes, 1D checkerboard insulators, and mixtures of these phases.

Host: Mohammad Faghfoor Maghrebi

CSS 2115 @ 11 am
College Park, MD 20742

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