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Ultrasensitive THz Detection with Graphene Nanobolometers

September 20, 2013 - 11:00am
Speaker: 
Dan E. Prober
Institution: 
Yale University

Abstract:
Graphene has recently been proposed as an ultrasensitive THz photon detector element with unsurpassed sensitivity. We have modeled the physical processes in a graphene single-photon detector in the THz range.(1-3) A Johnson noise temperature readout would be employed. We conclude that detection of individual THz photons should indeed be possible. Recently we have studied in experiment the energy loss processes in graphene above 2K, a key determinant of the photon detector performance. Current experiments extend these measurements down to 50 mK, with graphene bolometers having superconducting contacts. These contacts are used to confine the absorbed photon energy to the graphene, to allow the full detection sensitivity
to be achieved.

1. Graphene-based Bolometers," Xu Du, Daniel E. Prober, Heli Vora, and
Chris McKitterick, arxiv:1308.4065 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (2013).; submitted to J.
Low Temp. Phys.

2. Graphene microbolometers with superconducting contacts for terahertz
photon detection," C.B. McKitterick, H. Vora, X. Du, B.S. Karasik, and
D.E. Prober, arxiv:1307.5012 [cond-mat.mes-hall] (2013).

3. "Performance of Graphene Thermal Photon Detectors," C.B.
McKitterick, D.E. Prober, and B.S. Karasik, Journal of Applied Physics 113
044512 (2013).

All references available in www.yale.edu/proberlab

2202 Physics Building
College Park, MD 20742

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