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Latest News and Research

Tightening the Bounds on the Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but JQI physicists have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is. The work implies that quantum processors will work more slowly than some research has suggested. 
The work offers a better description of how quickly information can travel within a system built of quantum particles such as a group of individual atoms. Engineers will need to know this to build quantum computers, which will have vastly different designs and be able to solve certain problems much more easily than the computers of today. While the new finding does not give an exact speed for how fast information will be able to travel in these as-yet-unbuilt computers—a longstanding question—it does place a far tighter constraint on where this speed limit could be.

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Getting Better All the Time
JILA Strontium Atomic Clock Sets New Records

In another advance at the far frontiers of timekeeping by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers, the latest modification of a record-setting strontium atomic clock has achieved precision and stability levels that now mean the clock would neither gain nor lose one second in some 15 billion years*—roughly the age of the universe. Precision timekeeping has broad potential impacts on advanced communications, positioning technologies (such as GPS) and many other technologies. Besides keeping future technologies on schedule, the clock has potential applications that go well beyond simply marking time. Examples include a sensitive altimeter based on changes in gravity and experiments that explore quantum correlations between atoms. JQI fellow Marianna Safronova contributed theoretical work to this new result.

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Single photon detection system among nominees for UMD's "Most Promising Inventions" for 2014

UMD will honor nine nominees for the most promising new inventions at the Celebration of Innovation and Partnerships event on April 29, 2015. UMD’s Office of Technology Commercialization, part of the Division of Research, received a total of 187 disclosures in 2014. The nine nominees for Invention of the Year were selected based on their potential impact on science, society and the open market. Winners will be announced in three categories: life sciences, physical sciences and information sciences. A single photon detection system developed at NIST, by researchers from JQI and the Jet Propulsion Lab at CalTech, was among the nominees.

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A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI Fellow Vladimir Manucharyan and colleagues at Harvard University used NV centers in diamond to sense the properties of magnetic field noise tens of nanometers away from the silver samples.

Diamond, which is a vast array of carbon atoms, can contain a wide variety of defects. An NV center defect is formed when a nitrogen atom substitutes for a carbon atom and is adjacent...

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Sharper Nanoscopy
What happens when a quantum dot looks in a mirror?

The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination  quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.   One problem with this approach is that in such proximity, the emitter and object can interact with each other, blurring the resulting image.   Now, a new JQI study has shown how to sharpen nanoscale microscopy (nanoscopy) even more by better locating the exact position of the light source.

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Paul Julienne awarded William F. Meggers Award

The OSA announced JQI Fellow and NIST scientist Paul Julienne as the 2015 William F. Meggers Award recipient. The William F. Meggers Award recognizes outstanding work in spectroscopy. According to the citation, Julienne is being recognized for "seminal contributions to precision photoassociation and magnetic-Feshbach spectroscopy of ultracold atoms, and the application of these techniques to the formation of cold polar molecules." 

“OSA is greatly honored to recognize these leaders in the field of optics,” said Elizabeth Rogan, CEO, The Optical Society. “The recipients have demonstrated an expertise and leadership in their chosen field and have made significant contributions to the understanding of optics and photonics. OSA congratulates them on their outstanding achievements.” 

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Novel Phases for Bose Gases

Strongly correlated electronic systems, like superconductors, display remarkable electronic and magnetic properties, and are of considerable research interest. These systems are fermionic, meaning they are composed of a class of particle called a fermion. Bosonic systems, composed another family of particles called bosons, offer a level of control often not possible in solid state systems. Creating analogous states in bose gases is an excellent way to model the dynamics of these less tractable systems. This means engineering a gas that, when cooled down to a condensate, assumes a phase equivalent to its solid state counterpart.

JQI theorists Juraj Radic, Stefan Natu, and Victor Galitski have proposed a new magnetic phase for a bose gas. The transition to this phase is analogous to the formation of ferromagnetism in magnetic materials, like iron, and might give insight into the physics of...

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JQI Fellows Manucharyan and Hafezi awarded prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship

Two JQI Fellows, Mohammad Hafezi and Vladimir Manucharyan, are among the four University of Maryland faculty members that have been awarded 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. This award, granted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, identifies 126 early-career scientists based on their potential to contribute fundamentally significant research to a wider academic community.

UMD’s 2015 Sloan Research Fellows are:

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Latest News and Research

  • Tightening the Bounds on the Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

    If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but JQI physicists have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is. The work implies that quantum processors will work more slowly than some research has suggested. 
    The work offers a better... Continue Reading

  • Getting Better All the Time
    JILA Strontium Atomic Clock Sets New Records

    In another advance at the far frontiers of timekeeping by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers, the latest modification of a record-setting strontium atomic clock has achieved precision and stability levels that now mean the clock would neither gain nor lose one second in some 15 billion years*—roughly the age of the universe. Precision timekeeping has broad... Continue Reading

  • Single photon detection system among nominees for UMD's "Most Promising Inventions" for 2014

    UMD will honor nine nominees for the most promising new inventions at the Celebration of Innovation and Partnerships event on April 29, 2015. UMD’s Office of Technology Commercialization, part of the Division of Research, received a total of 187 disclosures in 2014. The nine nominees for... Continue Reading

  • A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

    The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI... Continue Reading

  • Sharper Nanoscopy
    What happens when a quantum dot looks in a mirror?

    The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination  quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.   One problem with this approach is that in such proximity, the emitter and... Continue Reading

  • Paul Julienne awarded William F. Meggers Award

    The OSA announced JQI Fellow and NIST scientist Paul Julienne as the 2015 William F. Meggers Award recipient. The William F. Meggers Award recognizes outstanding work in spectroscopy. According to the citation, Julienne is being recognized for "seminal contributions to precision photoassociation and magnetic-Feshbach spectroscopy of... Continue Reading

  • Novel Phases for Bose Gases

    Strongly correlated electronic systems, like superconductors, display remarkable electronic and magnetic properties, and are of considerable research interest. These systems are fermionic, meaning they are composed of a class of particle called a fermion. Bosonic systems, composed another family of particles called bosons, offer a level of control often not possible in solid state systems.... Continue Reading

  • JQI Fellows Manucharyan and Hafezi awarded prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship

    Two JQI Fellows, Mohammad Hafezi and Vladimir Manucharyan, are among the four University of Maryland faculty members that have been awarded 2015 Sloan Research Fellowships. This award, granted by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, identifies 126 early-career scientists based on their potential to... Continue Reading

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