RSS icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Vimeo icon
YouTube icon

Latest News and Research

Magic Wavelengths
Tuning up Rydberg atoms for quantum information applications

Rydberg atoms, atoms whose outermost electrons are highly excited but not ionized, are potentially important for storing an processing quantum information since they can preserve a superpostion of states for a long time. One problem with Rydberg atoms is that in they are often difficult to handle. One approach is to search for special wavelengths---“magic wavelengths”—at which atoms can be trapped and excited into Rydberg states without disturbing them. JQI researchers with collaborators from U. Delaware and U. Nevada compare precision calculations of these special wavelengths with experimental measurement. This work is featured as an Editor's Suggestion in the journal Physical Review A. 

Continue Reading
JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi Receives ONR Young Investigator Award

JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi was announced as a recipient of a 2015 ONR Young Investigator award. ONR's website describes the program as being designed to promote the professional development of early-career academic scientists – called investigators, or YIPs – both as researchers and instructors. For awardees, the funding supports laboratory equipment, graduate student stipends and scholarships, and other expenses critical to ongoing and planned investigational studies.

“These recipients demonstrate the type of visionary, multidisciplinary thought that helps the U.S. Navy anticipate and adapt to a dynamic battlespace,” said Dr. Larry Schuette, ONR’s director of research. “The breadth of their research and combined value of awards underscore the significance the Navy places on ingenuity, wherever it’s harbored, and support the framework for a Naval Innovation Network built on people, ideas and information.”

Continue Reading
Gretchen Campbell among finalists for Service to America Medal

Gretchen Campbell, a JQI Fellow and NIST Physicist, has been selected as a 2015 Finalist for a Service to America Medal. The highly respected honor highlights dedicated federal workers who have made significant contributions to our country. According to the award website, "The Sammies, known as the “Oscars” of government service, are a highly respected honor with a vigorous selection process. Named for the Partnership for Public Service’s late founder who was inspired by President Kennedy’s call to serve in 1963, these awards align with his vision of a dynamic and innovative federal workforce that meets the needs of the American people."

Campbell is nominated in the Call to Service category and is cited as having "Advanced the emerging field of physics known as atomtronics, paving the way for a new generation of technologies much like electronics has transformed our society today."

Continue Reading
JQI at Maryland Day 2015
Crowds brave cold temperatures to see cool physics

Despite cold weather and cloudy skies, UMD's annual Maryland Day (April 25, 2015) attracted thousands of visitors eager to learn about the university. The JQI was again located on the lawn outside the Toll Physics Building, and provided fun examples and analogs of quantum topics with demonstrations of parametric down conversion, wave-particle duality, charged dust traps, and the Meissner effect. The JQI thanks all of our volunteers for their hard work in making this day possible!

Continue Reading
Tightening the Bounds on the Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but JQI physicists have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is. The work implies that quantum processors will work more slowly than some research has suggested. 
The work offers a better description of how quickly information can travel within a system built of quantum particles such as a group of individual atoms. Engineers will need to know this to build quantum computers, which will have vastly different designs and be able to solve certain problems much more easily than the computers of today. While the new finding does not give an exact speed for how fast information will be able to travel in these as-yet-unbuilt computers—a longstanding question—it does place a far tighter constraint on where this speed limit could be.

Continue Reading
Single photon detection system among nominees for UMD's "Most Promising Inventions" for 2014

UMD will honor nine nominees for the most promising new inventions at the Celebration of Innovation and Partnerships event on April 29, 2015. UMD’s Office of Technology Commercialization, part of the Division of Research, received a total of 187 disclosures in 2014. The nine nominees for Invention of the Year were selected based on their potential impact on science, society and the open market. Winners will be announced in three categories: life sciences, physical sciences and information sciences. A single photon detection system developed at NIST, by researchers from JQI and the Jet Propulsion Lab at CalTech, was among the nominees.

Continue Reading
A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI Fellow Vladimir Manucharyan and colleagues at Harvard University used NV centers in diamond to sense the properties of magnetic field noise tens of nanometers away from the silver samples.

Diamond, which is a vast array of carbon atoms, can contain a wide variety of defects. An NV center defect is formed when a nitrogen atom substitutes for a carbon atom and is adjacent...

Continue Reading
Sharper Nanoscopy
What happens when a quantum dot looks in a mirror?

The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination  quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.   One problem with this approach is that in such proximity, the emitter and object can interact with each other, blurring the resulting image.   Now, a new JQI study has shown how to sharpen nanoscale microscopy (nanoscopy) even more by better locating the exact position of the light source.

Continue Reading

Latest News and Research

  • Magic Wavelengths
    Tuning up Rydberg atoms for quantum information applications

    Rydberg atoms, atoms whose outermost electrons are highly excited but not ionized, are potentially important for storing an processing quantum information since they can preserve a superpostion of states for a long time. One problem with Rydberg atoms is that in they are often difficult to handle. One approach is to search for special wavelengths---“magic wavelengths”—at which atoms can be... Continue Reading

  • JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi Receives ONR Young Investigator Award

    JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi was announced as a recipient of a 2015 ONR Young Investigator award. ONR's website describes the program as being designed to promote the professional development of early-career academic scientists – called investigators, or YIPs – both as researchers and instructors. For awardees, the funding supports laboratory equipment, graduate student stipends and scholarships... Continue Reading

  • Gretchen Campbell among finalists for Service to America Medal

    Gretchen Campbell, a JQI Fellow and NIST Physicist, has been selected as a 2015 Finalist for a Service to America Medal. The highly respected honor highlights dedicated federal workers who have made significant contributions to our country. According to the award website, "The Sammies, known as the “Oscars” of... Continue Reading

  • JQI at Maryland Day 2015
    Crowds brave cold temperatures to see cool physics

    Despite cold weather and cloudy skies, UMD's annual Maryland Day (April 25, 2015) attracted thousands of visitors eager to learn about the university. The JQI was again located on the lawn outside the Toll Physics Building, and provided fun examples and analogs of quantum topics with demonstrations of parametric down conversion, wave-particle duality, charged dust traps, and the Meissner... Continue Reading

  • Tightening the Bounds on the Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

    If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but JQI physicists have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is. The work implies that quantum processors will work more slowly than some research has suggested. 
    The work offers a better... Continue Reading

  • Single photon detection system among nominees for UMD's "Most Promising Inventions" for 2014

    UMD will honor nine nominees for the most promising new inventions at the Celebration of Innovation and Partnerships event on April 29, 2015. UMD’s Office of Technology Commercialization, part of the Division of Research, received a total of 187 disclosures in 2014. The nine nominees for... Continue Reading

  • A quantum sensor for nanoscale electron transport

    The word “defect” doesn’t usually have a good connotation--often indicating failure. But for physicists, one common defect known as a nitrogen-vacancy center (NV center) has applications in both quantum information processing and ultra-sensitive magnetometry, the measurement of exceedingly faint magnetic fields. In an experiment, recently published in Science, JQI... Continue Reading

  • Sharper Nanoscopy
    What happens when a quantum dot looks in a mirror?

    The 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize recognized important microscopy research that enabled greatly improved spatial resolution. This innovation, resulting in nanometer resolution, was made possible by making the source (the emitter) of the illumination  quite small and by moving it quite close to the object being imaged.   One problem with this approach is that in such proximity, the emitter and... Continue Reading

Twitter Updates

People Profiles

Subscribe to A Quantum Bit 

Quantum physics began with revolutionary discoveries in the early twentieth century and continues to be central in today’s physics research. Learn about quantum physics, bit by bit. From definitions to the latest research, this is your portal. Subscribe to receive regular emails from the quantum world. Previous Issues...

Sign Up Now

Sign up to receive A Quantum Bit in your email!

 Have an idea for A Quantum Bit? Submit your suggestions to jqi-comm@umd.edu