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April 17, 2014 | Research News

JQI at DAMOP

The June 2-6, 2014 meeting of the American Physical Society’s Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP) is one of the best showings of JQI research during the entire year. The following papers with JQI authors will be presented at the meeting in Madison, Wisconsin.

March 19, 2014 | Research News

Cold Chaos

At sub-micro-kelvin temperatures atoms or molecules move so slowly that it is better to think of them as spread-out, wavelike things a micron or more across, many times larger than any putative bond length (typically sub-nanometer in size) that would characterize bound molecules. A new experiment conducted at the University of Innsbruck in Austria adds a new twist to this picture.

March 6, 2014 | Research News

Up-Converted Radio

Ever worry about losing your mobile-phone reception? The problem is a weak microwave signal. A new approach to this important problem provides a clean, all-optical detection of microwaves and radiowaves featuring noise mitigation a thousand times better than existing methods.

February 14, 2014 | Research News

Solitary Confinement

Atomic nuclei are governed by laws quite distinct from those that regulate atomic electrons, which constitute the outer part of atoms and which are immediately responsible for light, chemistry and thus life. Yet there are sporadic regions of contact between these disparate realms. JQI Adjunct Fellow Marianna Safronova and her collaborators have been exploring one area of nuclear-atomic overlap for the isotope thorium-229.

JQI at APS
February 13, 2014 | People News | Research News

JQI at APS

The following papers with JQI authors will be presented at the March meeting of the American Physical Society, being held March 2-7, 2014 in Denver.

January 2, 2014 | Research News

The Entropy of Nations

Adam Smith showed in his book "The Wealth of Nations" that a sort of "hidden hand" was at work in distributing income among the population. A new JQI study shows that distribution of energy among nations is thermodynamic in nature.

December 26, 2013 | People News

JQI Fellow Gretchen Campbell receives PECASE

The 2013 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers were announced on Monday, December 23rd. JQI Fellow and NIST scientist Gretchen Campbell was among the honorees.

December 2, 2013 | PFC | Research News

Quantum Gimbal

Theorists at the Joint Quantum Institute predict that for some elements a vortex of atoms can be produced which pivots around another sample of atoms at rest in the middle. Such a quantum gimbal has been observed in condensates of two atomic species but never before in a swarm of exclusively one type of atoms in a state of lowest energy.

October 8, 2013 | People News

Congratulations to the 2013 Nobel Prize recipients Higgs and Englert

The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded “for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.”

September 30, 2013 | Research News

Seeing Light in a New Light

Alexey Gorshkov, formerly of CalTech and Harvard, recently joined the JQI as a new Fellow. His research group can be found at http://groups.jqi.umd.edu/gorshkov/. This is a news item released earlier this week by Harvard University.

September 20, 2013 | PFC | Research News

Simulation sets atoms shivering

JQI researchers perform a quantum simulation of the 1D Dirac equation, by assembling an analogue system of neutral atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

August 27, 2013 | PFC | People News

Peter Kordell is awarded undergraduate research prize

Peter Kordell, a UMD undergrad, was awarded the IPST Monroe Martin Prize for Undergraduate Research in Physics.

Upcoming Events

April 21, 2014
Bruno Laburthe-Tolra | Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers – Paris 13 University & CNRS – UMR 7538
April 23, 2014
Russell Bisset | Los Alamos National Laboratory
April 28, 2014
Vanderlei Bagnato | Instituo de Fisica de Sao Carlos - University of S. Paulo

People News

Outreach

PFC and JQI researchers engage the public in quantum research. Click here to request a visit from one of our scientists!

Twitter Updates

People Profiles

  • Ryan Barnett

    JQI alumnus Ryan Barnett, JQI

    Ryan Barnett, a former JQI postdoctoral fellow at the Condensed Matter Theory Center (CMTC), is now a ‘Lecturer in Condensed Matter Theory’ (UK equivalent of assistant professor) at Imperial College in London. Ryan is a theoretical physicist interested in collective effects in ultracold atomic gases. While at the JQI his research focused on spinor condensates, non-equilibrium dynamics, and synthetic gauge fields. Much of his recent work was motivated by ongoing experimental activities at the JQI. In addition to continuing this line of research, he will teach Mathematical Physics during the 2012-2013 academic year.

  • Phil Richerme

    Phil Richerme is a postdoc in Chris Monroe's Trapped Ion Quantum Information Group. He studies quantum magnetism using a well-controlled and well-isolated system of atomic ion spins, realizing Feynman's original proposal for a quantum simulator. These experiments probe the ground state and dynamical evolution of interacting spin systems, which are difficult (or impossible) for classical computers to calculate for even a few dozen spins. Phil received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 2012, working with Gerald Gabrielse and the ATRAP collaboration at CERN to trap antihydrogen atoms for sensitive tests of CPT symmetry.

  • David Hucul

    David Hucul

    David Hucul is a graduate student in Professor Chris Monroe's trapped ion quantum information lab at the Joint Quantum Institute. He earned undergraduate degrees in physics and chemistry in 2006 from the University of Michigan and a master's degree at MIT in 2009 under Wolfgang Ketterle. David started his PhD work with Chris Monroe in 2009 working on using frequency combs to entangle trapped ions. He now works on entangling trapped atoms within and between ion traps using both phonons and photons to create quantum networks.

    David became interested in atomic physics by accident, when he enjoyed an advanced chemistry course about spectroscopy and realized it was really physics. His first physics seminar was given by Chris Monroe, who was then a professor at Michigan. This made him a physicist. 

    He expects to finish his graduate studies sometime in 2015 and hopes to find a postdoctoral position after that.

  • Mohammad Hafezi

    Hafezi is a senior research associate and works at the interface of condensed matter theory and quantum optics. The focus of his research is on theoretical and experimental investigations of artificial gauge fields and topological order in photonics systems. Such systems can be exploited as robust optical devices insensitive to disorder, which is the subject of his NSF Physics Frontier Center’s seed funding program. Moreover, in the presence of strong optical nonlinearity, such systems are expected to exhibit fractional quantum Hall physics, providing a platform for potentially observing anoynic statistics. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 2009 where he worked with Mikhail Lukin and Eugene Demler. There, he studied strongly correlated physics in AMO systems. In particular, he worked on the topological characterization of ultracold atoms in 2D and also non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting photons in 1D.

  • Steven Olmshenck

    JQI alumnus Steven Olmshenck, JQI

    NRC postdoctoral fellow Steven Olmschenk will be joining the faculty at Denison University located in Granville, Ohio. Steve was a graduate student in Chris Monroe’s Trapped Ion Quantum Information group. For the last few years he has been a postdoc in the NIST Laser Cooling and Trapping Group. While at NIST he has worked on Trey Porto’s double-well optical lattice experiment. Upon moving to Dension he plans to build an ion trapping experiment. 

  • Gretchen Campbell, Fellow

    Campbell is a NIST JQI fellow and works in the Laser Cooling and Trapping group. In her atom circuits lab, reserachers probe Na BECs in toroidal traps. The goals of these experiments include studying superfluidity, as well as superfluid analogs to superconducting circuits. A second experiment with ultracold strontium is being built. She received a Ph.D from MIT in 2006, where she worked with Wolfgang Ketterle and Dave Pritchard. There, she used Rb BECs in optical lattices to study atom interferometry, nonlinear atom optics and the superfluid – Mott insulator phase transition. These experiments included the first direct observation of the atomic recoil momentum in dispersive media. More recently, she worked with Jun Ye on precision measurements and frequency metrology with an 87Sr optical lattice clock. 

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