RSS icon
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Vimeo icon
YouTube icon

More News

Interfering Waves
October 10, 2014 | PFC | Research News

Getting sharp images from dull detectors

A new extreme for sub-wavelength interference has been achieved by JQI scientists using thermal light and small-photon-number light detection. Achieving this kind of sharp interference pattern could be valuable for performing a variety of high-precision physics and astronomy measurements.

October 8, 2014 | PFC | Research News

A cold-atom ammeter

JQI scientists have added an important technique to the atomtronics arsenal, a method for analyzing a superfluid circuit component called a ‘weak link’. The result, detailed in the online journal Physical Review X, is the first direct measurement of the current-phase relationship of a weak link in a cold atom system.

October 2, 2014 | Research News

Quantum Environmentalism

A qubit exists in a superposition of two or more possible states, but this superposition is a fragile condition, in danger of being undone through interaction with the environment. A new paper addresses this problem by demonstrating a new type of qubit control, one that actually makes productive use of a qubit’s proximity to its surroundings.

Quantum point contact
September 18, 2014 | Research News

Two-dimensional electron liquids

A relatively new frontier for studying 2D matter is provided by planar collections of electrons at the surface of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials, in which high electron densities give rise to interactions that are stronger than in semiconductors.

September 2, 2014 | Research News

Cool Calculations for Cold Atoms

Two scientists at the Joint Quantum Institute have formulated a universal theory to describe the properties of Efimov states, a theory that, for the first time, does not need extra adjustable unknown parameters . This should allow physicists to predict the rates of chemical processes involving three atoms -- or even more -- using only a knowledge of the interaction forces at work.

August 21, 2014 | PFC | Research News

On-chip Topological Light

JQI researchers led by Mohammad Hafezi report detailed measurements of the transmission (how much energy is lost) and delay for edge-state light and for bulk-route light on a photonic chip.

July 31, 2014 | PFC | Research News

Spin Diagnostics

Recently physicists led JQI Fellow Christopher Monroe have executed an MRI-like diagnostic on a crystal of interacting quantum spins. They predict that their method is scalable and may be useful for validating experiments with much larger ensembles of interacting spins.

July 17, 2014 | Research News

Highly-Charged Ions

A new theoretical study conducted by JQI adjunct fellow Marianna Safronova and her colleagues from groups around the world provides the best yet study of how highly charged ions could be used for atomic timekeeping and for processing quantum information.

July 2, 2014 | Research News

Superconducting-Silicon Qubits

Theorists propose a way to make superconducting quantum devices such as Josephson junctions and qubits, atom-by-atom, inside a silicon crystal.

May 27, 2014 | PFC | Research News

Advanced Light

Michael Lewis’s bestselling book Flash Boys describes how some brokers, engaging in high frequency trading, exploit fast telecommunications to gain fraction-of-a-second advantage in the buying and selling of stocks. But you don’t need to have billions of dollars riding on this-second securities transactions to appreciate the importance of fast signal processing. From internet to video streaming, we want things fast.

May 23, 2014 | People News

Frontiers of Cold Matter

JQI fellow Paul Julienne has recently retired from NIST but continues to perform high-level theoretical research in the subject he helped to create---ultracold matter.  In honor of his birthday, a meeting called Frontiers of Cold Matter is being held May 29-30 at JQI.

May 5, 2014 | Research News

Stimulated Mutual Annihilation

JQI physicists report detailed calculations of the dynamics of a positronium BEC. This work is the first to account for effects of collisions between different positronium species. These collisions put important constraints on gamma-ray laser operation.

April 16, 2014 | People News

JQI Fellow Gretchen Campbell among PECASE awardees

Release from NIST Tech Beat, April 15, 2014

Three National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) researchers were among those honored April 14, 2014, at a White House reception as winners of Presidential Early Career Awards. The award is the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

People News

Outreach

PFC and JQI researchers engage the public in quantum research. Click here to request a visit from one of our scientists!

Twitter Updates

People Profiles

  • Stephen Powell

    JQI alumnus Stephen Powell, JQI

    Stephen Powell, a former JQI postdoctoral fellow at CMTC, now works at the Nordic Institute of Theoretical Physics or Nordita in Stockholm, Sweden. His research in the group of Sankar Das Sarma centered around strongly correlated systems with a specific focus on frustrated magnetism and ultracold gases. At Nordita, he will continue this line of research, which is at the meeting point of condensed matter and atomic physics. In talking of his postdoctoral experience he says, “Something I've particularly enjoyed about being at JQI is having close contact with various experimental groups here.”

  • Gretchen Campbell, Fellow

    Campbell is a NIST JQI fellow and works in the Laser Cooling and Trapping group. In her atom circuits lab, reserachers probe Na BECs in toroidal traps. The goals of these experiments include studying superfluidity, as well as superfluid analogs to superconducting circuits. A second experiment with ultracold strontium is being built. She received a Ph.D from MIT in 2006, where she worked with Wolfgang Ketterle and Dave Pritchard. There, she used Rb BECs in optical lattices to study atom interferometry, nonlinear atom optics and the superfluid – Mott insulator phase transition. These experiments included the first direct observation of the atomic recoil momentum in dispersive media. More recently, she worked with Jun Ye on precision measurements and frequency metrology with an 87Sr optical lattice clock. 

  • David Hucul

    David Hucul

    David Hucul is a graduate student in Professor Chris Monroe's trapped ion quantum information lab at the Joint Quantum Institute. He earned undergraduate degrees in physics and chemistry in 2006 from the University of Michigan and a master's degree at MIT in 2009 under Wolfgang Ketterle. David started his PhD work with Chris Monroe in 2009 working on using frequency combs to entangle trapped ions. He now works on entangling trapped atoms within and between ion traps using both phonons and photons to create quantum networks.

    David became interested in atomic physics by accident, when he enjoyed an advanced chemistry course about spectroscopy and realized it was really physics. His first physics seminar was given by Chris Monroe, who was then a professor at Michigan. This made him a physicist. 

    He expects to finish his graduate studies sometime in 2015 and hopes to find a postdoctoral position after that.

  • Mohammad Hafezi

    Hafezi is JQI fellow and works at the interface of condensed matter theory and quantum optics. The focus of his research is on theoretical and experimental investigations of artificial gauge fields and topological order in photonics systems. Such systems can be exploited as robust optical devices insensitive to disorder, which is the subject of his NSF Physics Frontier Center’s seed funding program. Moreover, in the presence of strong optical nonlinearity, such systems are expected to exhibit fractional quantum Hall physics, providing a platform for potentially observing anoynic statistics. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 2009 where he worked with Mikhail Lukin and Eugene Demler. There, he studied strongly correlated physics in AMO systems. In particular, he worked on the topological characterization of ultracold atoms in 2D and also non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting photons in 1D.

  • Ryan Barnett

    JQI alumnus Ryan Barnett, JQI

    Ryan Barnett, a former JQI postdoctoral fellow at the Condensed Matter Theory Center (CMTC), is now a ‘Lecturer in Condensed Matter Theory’ (UK equivalent of assistant professor) at Imperial College in London. Ryan is a theoretical physicist interested in collective effects in ultracold atomic gases. While at the JQI his research focused on spinor condensates, non-equilibrium dynamics, and synthetic gauge fields. Much of his recent work at CMTC was motivated by ongoing experimental activities at the JQI. 

  • Crystal Senko

    Crystal Senko is a graduate student in Chris Monroe's ion trapping group. While in the group she has focused on ultrafast spin manipulation as well as quantum simulation of magnetism. Senko is an undergraduate alumni of Duke University, where she worked with Dan Gauthier on magneto-optical trapping using distributed feedback lasers.

Subscribe to A Quantum Bit 

Quantum physics began with revolutionary discoveries in the early twentieth century and continues to be central in today’s physics research. Learn about quantum physics, bit by bit. From definitions to the latest research, this is your portal. Subscribe to receive regular emails from the quantum world. Previous Issues...

Sign Up Now

Sign up to receive A Quantum Bit in your email!

 Have an idea for A Quantum Bit? Submit your suggestions to jqi-comm@umd.edu