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Latest News and Research

Interacting Ion Qutrits
Enlisting symmetry to protect quantum states from disruptions

In quantum mechanics, symmetry describes more than just the patterns that matter takes — it is used to classify the nature of quantum states. These states can be entangled, exhibiting peculiar connections that cannot be explained without the use of quantum physics. For some entangled states, the symmetry of these connections can offer a kind of protection against disruptions. Physicists are interested in exploring these classes of protected states because building a useful quantum device requires its building blocks to be robust against outside disturbances that may interfere with device operations.

Recently, JQI researchers under the direction of Christopher Monroe have used trapped atomic ions to construct a system that could potentially support a type of symmetry-protected...Continue Reading

Gretchen Campbell receives IUPAP Young Scientist Prize

JQI Fellow and NIST Scientist Gretchen Campbell has recently been announced as the IUPAP 2015 Young Scientist Prize recipient in the field of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics. The organization cited her "outstanding contributions in toroidal Bose-Einstein condensates and its application to "atomtronic" circuits." 

The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) was established in 1922 in Brussels with 13 Member countries and the first General Assembly was held in 1923 in Paris. More about the prize can be found at http://iupap.org/young-scientist-prize/Continue Reading

Qubit Chemistry
Controlling interactions between distant qubits

A big part of the burgeoning science of quantum computation is reliably storing and processing information in the form of quantum bits, or qubits.  One of the obstacles to this goal is the difficulty of preserving the fragile quantum condition of qubits against unwanted outside influence even as the qubits interact among themselves in a programmatic way. 

Spin qubits are one of the most promising candidates for the purpose.  Besides being charged, electrons possess spin, a kind of magnetic axis that can only assume specific quantized values.  An atom with a single unpaired electron can serve as a qubit if that electron can be tickled into residing in both of two allowed quantum states (usually called spin up and down) at the same time.  Likewise, a carefully contrived small...Continue Reading

Collecting Lost Light
Rayleigh scattering reveals light propagation in optical nanfibers

Optical fibers are hair-like threads of glass used to guide light. Fibers of exceptional purity have proved an excellent way of sending information over long distances and are the foundation of modern telecommunication systems. JQI researchers in collaboration with scientists from the Naval Research Laboratory have developed a new technique for visualizing light propagation through an optical nanofiber, detailed in a recent Optica paper. The result is a non-invasive measurement of the fiber size and shape and a real-time view of how light fields evolve along the nanofiber. Direct measurement of the fields in and around an optical nanofiber offers insight into how light...Continue Reading

Moving out of equilibrium
Magnetization dynamics in a checkerboard optical lattice

In the quest to better explain and even harness the strange and amazing behaviors of interacting quantum systems, well-characterized and controllable atomic gases have emerged as a tool for emulating the behavior of solids. This is because physicists can use lasers to force atoms in dilute quantum gases to act, in many ways, like electrons in solids. The hope is studying the same physics in the atom-laser system will help scientists understand the inner workings of different exotic materials.

JQI physicists, led by Trey Porto, are interested in quantum magnetic ordering, which is believed to be intimately related to high-temperature superconductivity and also has significance in other massively connected quantum systems. Recently, the group studied the magnetic and motional...Continue Reading

JQI undergraduate honored for thesis work
Michael Kossin earns IPST Monroe Martin Prize and Departmental High Honors

Michael Kossin, an undergraduate who works with JQI Fellow Luis Orozco, has been awarded an IPST Monroe Martin Prize for Undergraduate Research in Physics for his paper, "Production of a Polarizing Millimeter-Wave Fabry-Perot Resonator.” He also earned Departmental High Honors. This summer Kossin will work with Professor Alejandro Garcia at the University of Washington, whose research involves weak interactions in the nucleus. Kossin plans to attend graduate school in 2016. 

About the award:

Dr. Martin, a native of Lancaster, PA, studied mathematics at Lebanon Valley College before...Continue Reading

JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi Receives ONR Young Investigator Award

JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi was announced as a recipient of a 2015 ONR Young Investigator award. ONR's website describes the program as being designed to promote the professional development of early-career academic scientists – called investigators, or YIPs – both as researchers and instructors. For awardees, the funding supports laboratory equipment, graduate student stipends and scholarships, and other expenses critical to ongoing and planned investigational studies.

“These recipients demonstrate the type of visionary, multidisciplinary thought that helps the U.S. Navy anticipate and adapt to a dynamic battlespace,” said Dr. Larry Schuette, ONR’s director of research. “The breadth of their research and combined value of awards underscore the significance the Navy places on...Continue Reading

JQI at Maryland Day 2015
Crowds brave cold temperatures to see cool physics

Despite cold weather and cloudy skies, UMD's annual Maryland Day (April 25, 2015) attracted thousands of visitors eager to learn about the university. The JQI was again located on the lawn outside the Toll Physics Building, and provided fun examples and analogs of quantum topics with demonstrations of parametric down conversion, wave-particle duality, charged dust traps, and the Meissner effect. The JQI thanks all of our volunteers for their hard work in making this day possible!Continue Reading

Latest News and Research

  • Interacting Ion Qutrits
    Enlisting symmetry to protect quantum states from disruptions

    In quantum mechanics, symmetry describes more than just the patterns that matter takes — it is used to classify the nature of quantum states. These states can be entangled, exhibiting peculiar connections that cannot be explained without the use of quantum physics. For some entangled states, the symmetry of these connections can offer a kind of protection against disruptions. Physicists are... Continue Reading

  • Gretchen Campbell receives IUPAP Young Scientist Prize

    JQI Fellow and NIST Scientist Gretchen Campbell has recently been announced as the IUPAP 2015 Young Scientist Prize recipient in the field of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics. The organization cited her "outstanding contributions in toroidal Bose-Einstein condensates and its application to "atomtronic" circuits." 

    The International... Continue Reading

  • Qubit Chemistry
    Controlling interactions between distant qubits

    A big part of the burgeoning science of quantum computation is reliably storing and processing information in the form of quantum bits, or qubits.  One of the obstacles to this goal is the difficulty of preserving the fragile quantum condition of qubits against unwanted outside influence even as the qubits interact among themselves in a programmatic way. 

    Spin qubits are one of the most... Continue Reading

  • Collecting Lost Light
    Rayleigh scattering reveals light propagation in optical nanfibers

    Optical fibers are hair-like threads of glass used to guide light. Fibers of exceptional purity have proved an excellent way of sending information over long distances and are the foundation of modern telecommunication systems. JQI researchers in collaboration with scientists from the Naval Research Laboratory have developed a new technique for visualizing light propagation through an optical... Continue Reading

  • Moving out of equilibrium
    Magnetization dynamics in a checkerboard optical lattice

    In the quest to better explain and even harness the strange and amazing behaviors of interacting quantum systems, well-characterized and controllable atomic gases have emerged as a tool for emulating the behavior of solids. This is because physicists can use lasers to force atoms in dilute quantum gases to act, in many ways, like electrons in solids. The hope is studying the same physics in... Continue Reading

  • JQI undergraduate honored for thesis work
    Michael Kossin earns IPST Monroe Martin Prize and Departmental High Honors

    Michael Kossin, an undergraduate who works with JQI Fellow Luis Orozco, has been awarded an IPST Monroe Martin Prize for Undergraduate Research in Physics for his paper, "Production of a Polarizing Millimeter-Wave Fabry-Perot Resonator.” He also earned Departmental High Honors. This summer Kossin will work with ... Continue Reading

  • JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi Receives ONR Young Investigator Award

    JQI Fellow Mohammad Hafezi was announced as a recipient of a 2015 ONR Young Investigator award. ONR's website describes the program as being designed to promote the professional development of early-career academic scientists – called investigators, or YIPs – both as researchers and instructors. For awardees, the funding supports laboratory equipment, graduate student stipends and scholarships... Continue Reading

  • JQI at Maryland Day 2015
    Crowds brave cold temperatures to see cool physics

    Despite cold weather and cloudy skies, UMD's annual Maryland Day (April 25, 2015) attracted thousands of visitors eager to learn about the university. The JQI was again located on the lawn outside the Toll Physics Building, and provided fun examples and analogs of quantum topics with demonstrations of parametric down conversion, wave-particle duality, charged dust traps, and the Meissner... Continue Reading

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August 4, 2015
Arno Rauschenbeutel | Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology,Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics,Vienna University of Technology, Wien, Austria

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